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ACM Computing Surveys (CSUR)
Paper

An Introduction to Proving the Correctness of Programs

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Abstract

This paper explains, in an introductory fashion, the method of specifying the correct behavior of a program by the use of input/output assertions and describes one method for showing that the program is correct with respect to those assertions. An initial assertion characterizes conditions expected to be true upon entry to the program and a final assertion characterizes conditions expected to be true upon exit from the program. When a program contains no branches, a technique known as symbolic execution can be used to show that the truth of the initial assertion upon entry guarantees the truth of the final assertion upon exit. More generally, for a program with branches one can define a symbolic execution tree. If there is an upper bound on the number of times each loop in such a program may be executed, a proof of correctness can be given by a simple traversal of the (finite) symbolic execution tree. However, for most programs, no fixed bound on the number of times each loop is executed exists and the corresponding symbolic execution trees are infinite. In order to prove the correctness of such programs, a more general assertion structure must be provided. The symbolic execution tree of such programs must be traversed inductively rather than explicitly. This leads naturally to the use of additional assertions which are called “inductive assertions. © 1976, ACM. All rights reserved.

Date

01 Sep 1976

Publication

ACM Computing Surveys (CSUR)

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