Publication
Journal of Environmental Engineering
Paper

Water quality of drainage from permeable friction course

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Abstract

An overlay of porous asphalt known as permeable friction course (PFC) is an innovative roadway material that improves both driving conditions in wet weather and water quality. Placed in a layer 25-50mm thick on top of regular impermeable pavement, PFC allows rainfall to drain within the porous layer rather than on top of the pavement. This paper presents water quality measurements for PFC and conventional pavement collected over six years near Austin, TX and two years in eastern North Carolina. The data show that concentrations of total suspended solids from PFC are more than 90% lower than from conventional pavement. Lower effluent concentrations are also observed for total amounts of phosphorus, copper, lead, and zinc. The combined data sets show that PFC's benefits last through the design life of the pavement, that results in Texas are consistent with those from North Carolina, and that both are consistent with earlier studies from France, the Netherlands, and Germany. © 2012 American Society of Civil Engineers.

Date

01 Feb 2012

Publication

Journal of Environmental Engineering

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