Today, quantum computing is a researcher’s playground. In five years, it will be mainstream.

In five years, the effects of quantum computing will reach beyond the research lab. It will be used extensively by new categories of professionals and developers looking to this emerging method of computing to solve problems once considered unsolvable. 

 

Today, quantum computing is a researcher’s playground. In five years, it will be mainstream.

In five years, the effects of quantum computing will reach beyond the research lab. It will be used extensively by new categories of professionals and developers looking to this emerging method of computing to solve problems once considered unsolvable. 

 

Quantum computers are rapidly emerging

Quantum computers are incredibly powerful machines that take a new approach to processing information using the principles of quantum mechanics. The computers we use today are known as classical computers. They have enabled amazing things and become ubiquitous in our lives. There are, however, still problems they can't solve. These problems generally involved exponential scaling such as large-scale optimization or chemistry simulations. Quantum computers are being built to work with classical computers to potentially solve these problems.

Quantum computers are rapidly emerging. Pursued for decades in research labs, prototype machines are today getting bigger and more capable. Yet the technology is not generally understood. The concepts and vocabulary are foreign to most and access to the machines has largely rested with the scientific community. Industries are just starting to explore the possibilities and universities are beginning to develop quantum computing curriculums. Pursued for decades in research labs, prototype machines are today getting bigger and more capable.

Challenges facing us today

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There are certain problems that classical computers will simply never be able to solve. 

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Understanding of quantum computing is largely limited to research labs.

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Advancing quantum computing will require understanding of the technology beyond the scientific community.

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Quantum computing curriculum and education is nascent. 

5 in 5 presentation

IBM researcher Talia Gershon discusses her work on providing access to quantum computers for industries, researchers, developers, and students to start creating the future of computing.

 

5 in 5 presentation

IBM researcher Talia Gershon discusses her work on providing access to quantum computers for industries, researchers, developers, and students to start creating the future of computing.

 

Quantum computers go beyond the lab

In the future, Quantum computers will no longer be seen as mysterious. The general public will embrace this new era, as our collective understanding of quantum computing continues to grow and touch every industry and every educational institution. This explosion in general public knowledge will help initiate the dawn of the commercial quantum era – a formative period when quantum computing technology and its early use cases develop rapidly. 

Within five years, the industry will have discovered the first applications where a quantum computer (used alongside a classical computer) will offer a benefit to solving specific problems. A clear advantage will be awarded to early adopters in the era of quantum computing. 

Quantum will also be ubiquitous in university classrooms. From computer science courses to chemistry and business classes, students will become familiar with this technology and pursue career paths rooted in quantum computing. Quantum computing will be deeply embedded in a range of curricula, and learning about it will be a pre-requisite for science and engineering programs worldwide.

illustration of a quantum computer

Quantum chemistry advances

IBM Researchers are already reaching major quantum chemistry milestones, having recently used a quantum computer to successfully simulate atomic bonding in beryllium hydride (BeH2); the most complex molecule ever simulated by a quantum computer. In the future, quantum computers will continue to address problems with ever-greater complexity, eventually catching up to and surpassing what we can do with classical machines alone. 

 

Quantum chemistry advances

IBM Researchers are already reaching major quantum chemistry milestones, having recently used a quantum computer to successfully simulate atomic bonding in beryllium hydride (BeH2); the most complex molecule ever simulated by a quantum computer. In the future, quantum computers will continue to address problems with ever-greater complexity, eventually catching up to and surpassing what we can do with classical machines alone. 

 

Abhinav Kandala, Antonio Mezzacapo, and Kristan Temme | IBM Q

Experiment on a quantum computer today

The IBM Q experience enables anyone to connect at no cost to one of IBM’s quantum processors via the IBM Cloud, to run algorithms and experiments, and to collaboratively explore what might be possible with quantum computing.

 

Experiment on a quantum computer today

The IBM Q experience enables anyone to connect at no cost to one of IBM’s quantum processors via the IBM Cloud, to run algorithms and experiments, and to collaboratively explore what might be possible with quantum computing.

 

Illustration of quantum information processing

Predictions

IBM 5 in 5 predictions